2/08/2014

Crates are Great-Why Dogs Need Crate Training

If you're a new puppy owner and don't have a crate, you don't have all the tools necessary to train your dog. The crate isn't about punishment; it's about a safe place for that four-footed ball of fur with the wagging tail. 

Here's why you need a crate:

1. Dogs naturally love a den and the crate can provide that space of comfort and safety for the new addition to the family.
2. A crate will help you housetrain the new puppy with less stress on you and the dog.
3. It's a safe place for napping and getting away from the bustle of the household. (No--not you, the puppy.) Puppies are babies and need their rest.
4. A crate-trained dog will travel better whether in the car or in the air.

Here's how to start crate training your new puppy:

1. Purchase a crate that comfortably accommodates your dog at his anticipated adult size.  If you're bringing home an 8-week old Labrador, don't purchase a small crate that fits him this week. Puppies grow quickly, so purchase once and get one that will accommodate him when he's 80 pounds. You may want to block one end of the crate if you need to get an especially large one.  

2. The puppy or dog should be able to stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably in the crate.

2. An old towel works wells on the floor of the crate until the puppy is housetrained. Provide one or two toys and let the puppy find the way in and out without the door being shut. Don't force the puppy into the area. Puppies are naturally curious and will want to explore. Positive reinforcement always. Happy puppy and happy owner. On the flip side, don't let the puppy out merely because he's whining and barking. He'll learn that if he makes noise, instant freedom is the result.

3. Dogs don't like to soil their sleeping area, so the crate is an essential tool to successful housetraining. A regular schedule is a must. Young puppies simply do not have the control to "hold it" for hours.  Here's the schedule provided by www.dogbreedinfo.com



6 weeks—elimination every hour
2 months—pup should have 2 to 3 hours of control
3 months—4 hours
4 months and up—5 hours
Many young dogs can go all night at 3 months
.


4. Feed the puppy at regular times and take her out right after eating. Lots of praise when she does all her "business" outside and then give her some playtime before returning inside.

5. Dogs shouldn't be crated for hours on end. The crate is for sleeping and when you can't watch her. Phone call or someone comes to the door? It's crate time for the puppy until you are able to supervise the furball again. More frustration with puppies happens when they are unsupervised. Chewing, peeing, pooping, and eating random things are all some of the problems that come with a puppy left to her own devices. Think of it as the playpen. You certainly wouldn't leave a toddler unsupervised with run of the house. Too many bad things can happen within minutes, even seconds. It's the same with puppies. 

6. It's recommended that you keep the crate in your bedroom while the pup is young and has to go out in the night. Yup, that's right. You will have to get up and take her out. In a few short weeks, you'll find that most are able to sleep through the night with no accidents. 

Our old Lab still loves to sleep in his crate which is in the garage. He traveled across the U.S. in the back of our Jeep Liberty in the same crate. He was just over a year old then, with tons of energy. He was more settled and I knew he was safely contained while we were on the road for that long four day trip. These days, the door is always open so he can come and go as he pleases. Your dog should feel the same way about his or her crate. A lifelong friendship with the crate is desirable.

For more info on crate training try these links: 
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cratetraining.htm  
http://www.perfectpaws.com/crt.html

Flying with your dog? Airlines have their specific rules, so be sure to talk with your airline before the trip. For general information on flying with your four-footed companion check out:  http://www.bringfido.com/travel/us_regulations/.

2 comments:

Michelle Moore said...

Vets North Somerset
Actually this is the first time that I've heard about crates training for dogs. I hope you can share more about it for us. Thanks!

http://wellpets.co.uk/worle/

Elizabeth Flores said...

Thank you so much for taking the time for you personally to share such a nice info. I definitely enjoying every little bit of it. It is a great website and nice share.
dog crate with wooden cover

Positively encouraging

2/08/2014

Crates are Great-Why Dogs Need Crate Training

If you're a new puppy owner and don't have a crate, you don't have all the tools necessary to train your dog. The crate isn't about punishment; it's about a safe place for that four-footed ball of fur with the wagging tail. 

Here's why you need a crate:

1. Dogs naturally love a den and the crate can provide that space of comfort and safety for the new addition to the family.
2. A crate will help you housetrain the new puppy with less stress on you and the dog.
3. It's a safe place for napping and getting away from the bustle of the household. (No--not you, the puppy.) Puppies are babies and need their rest.
4. A crate-trained dog will travel better whether in the car or in the air.

Here's how to start crate training your new puppy:

1. Purchase a crate that comfortably accommodates your dog at his anticipated adult size.  If you're bringing home an 8-week old Labrador, don't purchase a small crate that fits him this week. Puppies grow quickly, so purchase once and get one that will accommodate him when he's 80 pounds. You may want to block one end of the crate if you need to get an especially large one.  

2. The puppy or dog should be able to stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably in the crate.

2. An old towel works wells on the floor of the crate until the puppy is housetrained. Provide one or two toys and let the puppy find the way in and out without the door being shut. Don't force the puppy into the area. Puppies are naturally curious and will want to explore. Positive reinforcement always. Happy puppy and happy owner. On the flip side, don't let the puppy out merely because he's whining and barking. He'll learn that if he makes noise, instant freedom is the result.

3. Dogs don't like to soil their sleeping area, so the crate is an essential tool to successful housetraining. A regular schedule is a must. Young puppies simply do not have the control to "hold it" for hours.  Here's the schedule provided by www.dogbreedinfo.com



6 weeks—elimination every hour
2 months—pup should have 2 to 3 hours of control
3 months—4 hours
4 months and up—5 hours
Many young dogs can go all night at 3 months
.


4. Feed the puppy at regular times and take her out right after eating. Lots of praise when she does all her "business" outside and then give her some playtime before returning inside.

5. Dogs shouldn't be crated for hours on end. The crate is for sleeping and when you can't watch her. Phone call or someone comes to the door? It's crate time for the puppy until you are able to supervise the furball again. More frustration with puppies happens when they are unsupervised. Chewing, peeing, pooping, and eating random things are all some of the problems that come with a puppy left to her own devices. Think of it as the playpen. You certainly wouldn't leave a toddler unsupervised with run of the house. Too many bad things can happen within minutes, even seconds. It's the same with puppies. 

6. It's recommended that you keep the crate in your bedroom while the pup is young and has to go out in the night. Yup, that's right. You will have to get up and take her out. In a few short weeks, you'll find that most are able to sleep through the night with no accidents. 

Our old Lab still loves to sleep in his crate which is in the garage. He traveled across the U.S. in the back of our Jeep Liberty in the same crate. He was just over a year old then, with tons of energy. He was more settled and I knew he was safely contained while we were on the road for that long four day trip. These days, the door is always open so he can come and go as he pleases. Your dog should feel the same way about his or her crate. A lifelong friendship with the crate is desirable.

For more info on crate training try these links: 
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/cratetraining.htm  
http://www.perfectpaws.com/crt.html

Flying with your dog? Airlines have their specific rules, so be sure to talk with your airline before the trip. For general information on flying with your four-footed companion check out:  http://www.bringfido.com/travel/us_regulations/.

2 comments:

Michelle Moore said...

Vets North Somerset
Actually this is the first time that I've heard about crates training for dogs. I hope you can share more about it for us. Thanks!

http://wellpets.co.uk/worle/

Elizabeth Flores said...

Thank you so much for taking the time for you personally to share such a nice info. I definitely enjoying every little bit of it. It is a great website and nice share.
dog crate with wooden cover